Thursday, January 20, 2011

Micron Scorpion Z6L Installation and Programming Manual

I recently added a few more sensors to my Micron Scorpion Z6L Home Alarm. The wiring side of things was really easy, but I found that the new zones weren't quite programmed correctly for what I wanted to do.

When I tried Googling around to find the installer manual, I came up with nothing except the Hungarian version. I would suspect that the Alarm System vendors and distributors don't like the idea of just anyone having access to the manual / knowledge; why would they when keeping it to themselves gives them the right to charge ridiculous sums for service calls. I refuse to pay for something that I can easily do myself on a Sunday afternoon.

Ok, anyway, I eventually found a manual for the Scorpion Z4110, which although is slightly a different model, has most of the same programming codes as the Z6L. Once you get your head around the concept of the programming address locations and data, it's pretty easy to figure out the rest.

I found the original file on the Eagle Alarms site, but I've since put it up on uploading.com to make sure it floats around the internet a bit more: http://uploading.com/files/fe8a5a83/z4110-user-instructions.pdf/

The key bit that worked for me is that on my unit, the master programming PIN code was still set to the default of "0000". And if this has been changed, there is an "Emergency Access to Program Mode" feature described in the manual which allows you to gain access if locked out. However, the emergency mode feature can also be disabled, so if this has also been disabled by the installer the unit is basically un-programmable by the end user.

1 comment:

Paul McKay said...

As an alarm installer myself, the reason we would use a confidential installer code is to actually protect the owner of the system from themselves.
The average home owner is best kept out of the programming of their panel as they can cause problems with their panel programming.
A prominent reason for locking the user out of the programming side is to protect the owner from voiding the warranty the installer gives the owner on the instillation of the alarm system. If the owner of the panel has the installer manual and the installer code, who’s to say when the panel starts to misbehave the user hasn’t altered the programming and caused the issue?
As for installer locking out the panel (protecting the panel from being accessed from the emergency access mode), this tends to be done by the installer that is afraid of being denied future work by the client. It is something I morally object to and won’t do.